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Dutch Oven Fresh Peach Cobbler

Dutch Oven Fresh Peach Cobbler is a decadently sweet cast iron dessert that will delight your whole family. Prepare for your kitchen to smell just like summertime happiness!

Dutch oven fresh peach cobbler is one of our favorite ways to pay homage to sweet, juicy peaches and is easy to make in the oven OR over a campfire, if you’re so inspired.

Dutch Oven Fresh Peach Cobbler with fresh peaches

A classic southern dessert recipe, the best peach cobbler made in cast iron starts with fresh peaches. Cobbler is a popular choice for a sweet treat, the best of both worlds of biscuit and cake with buttery golden goodness.

How can you tell if peaches are cobbler ready? They should be dark yellow, have their signature sweet smell and should be slightly delicate instead of firm to the touch. If they are firm and lack the smell, they aren’t quite ripe.

You can speed up ripeness a little bit if desired by placing your peaches in a brown paper bag, gently closed and left out at room temperature. Check after 24 hours and recheck until they reach the desired smell and texture.

Best Peach Cobbler made in cast iron

How to store cast iron Peach Cobbler

As with many cooked fruit desserts, you’ll want to enjoy your dutch oven fresh peach cobbler within 2-3 days so it is safe for consumption.

Allow your cobbler to fully cool and then you can portion out scoops or slices to store in the refrigerator. Be sure to cover with foil or plastic wrap to keep your cobbler from excess moisture/air.

To reheat, return your peach cobbler to the oven for 15 minutes at 400F, then reduce to 350F for another 20 minutes.

Can Peach Cobbler be frozen?

Peaches are a delicious summer fruit, but that doesn’t mean you can’t enjoy them during the year with your dutch oven fresh peach cobbler. You can freeze baked cobbler for 6-8 months.

You may also find others say you can freeze your cobbler unbaked – but this doesn’t work for cast iron. Cast iron that is subjected to drastic changes in temperature (frozen to hot) can experience cracking/damage. Also, unbaked cobbler doesn’t last as long in the freezer.

Choosing your cast iron

Picking the best cast iron doesn’t have to be intimidating. Especially when it comes to a dutch oven – it will come in handy in so many ways.

Even if you’re just a beginner, there is no reason to shy away. We recommend starting with a enameled dutch oven which offers the benefits with easier cleaning and maintenance. Le Creuset makes our dutch oven of choice, with ours offered the cast iron benefits we desire such as even heat all while we’re able to wash with soap like other dishes.

If you’re not sure why that fact is kind of magical, traditional cast iron is not soap friendly and can strip the seasoning.

How to make Peach Cobbler in a dutch oven

Prepare your peaches by pealing, pitting and slicing them for your cobbler. Melt butter in your dutch oven and heat over the the stove top to caramelize your peaches for about 5 minutes. Add your cinnamon, nutmeg, brown sugar, honey and bourbon to the peaches, giving the filling 3-5 minutes to simmer while you stir and allow the bourbon to burn off.

Next you’ll want to create a slurry with cornstarch in a glass. Remove your dutch oven from the heat and add the slurry, stirring it in to the mixture to complete your peach cobbler filling.

The topping for your dutch oven-fresh peach cobbler is as easy as mixing your dry ingredients (flour, baking power, salt, sugar) with your cold butter, cutting in with a pastry cutter. Once this mix is good and crumbly, you’ll add your cold milk. Top your filling evenly, sprinkle cinnamon sugar on top and bake for 30 minutes for southern summer perfection.

What to serve with Dutch Oven Fresh Peach Cobbler

Looking for a way to bring it all together for a full meal plan? This section found in every post will help you pair the recipe you’re viewing, with other flavorful dishes to make your mealtime that much easier. Enjoy this section of posts? Leave a comment below and let me know!

white bowl full of dutch oven peach cobbler
5 from 1 vote

Dutch Oven Fresh Peach Cobbler

Print Recipe
Prep Time:30 mins
Cook Time:30 mins
Total Time:1 hr

Ingredients

  • 4 Tablespoons butter
  • 5 cups peaches (about 8-10) pealed, pitted, and sliced
  • 1/2 teaspoon cinnamon
  • 1/4 teaspoon nutmeg
  • 1/3 cup brown sugar lightly packed
  • 1/4 cup honey
  • 1/4 cup good bourbon
  • 2 teaspoons cornstarch
  • 3 Tablespoons cold water

Cobbler Topping

  • 1-1/2 cups all-purpose flour
  • 1 teaspoon baking powder
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1/2 cup sugar white cane sugar
  • 1/2 cup butter one stick
  • 1/2 cup milk

Sprinkle

  • 2 Tablespoons sugar white cane
  • 1/2 teaspoon cinnamon

Instructions

  • Pre-heat the oven to 400F. Peel, pit, and slice your peaches. Slice the peaches into about 1/2 inch slice.
  • Melt 4 Tablespoons of butter into a dutch oven on the stovetop over medium heat. Add the peaches to your dutch oven and start to cook down. Stir the peaches to be covered by the melted butter. Cook for 5 minutes, stirring twice.
  • Add the cinnamon, nutmeg, brown sugar, honey, and bourbon. Then give a good stir. Allow the filling to cook over medium for 5-10 minutes to ensure the alcohol has burned off. As the filling cooks, the liquid will become like a syrup. It should reach a consistency between maple syrup and honey. Stir often to keep sugars from burning to the bottom of the dutch oven.
  • In a small glass mix the cornstarch with water to create a slurry. Remove the dutch oven from the heat and stir in the slurry. Stir it a few times as it sits between removing from the heat and adding the topping.
  • In a medium bowl combine the dry ingredients of the topping. Add the cold butter and cut in using a pastry cutter. When crumbly, drizzle in cold milk and stir to combine. Spoon evenly, yet rusticly over the filling. Sprinkle with cinnamon sugar and bake uncovered for 30 minutes.
Author: Katie Chase

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2 Comments

  1. 5 stars
    I love to make a peach cobbler in my cast iron. My last one was too dry. Definitely trying this recipe.

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